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2009 U.S. Amateur Championship Fact Sheet

Aug. 24 - 30


Southern Hills Country Club — Tulsa, Okla.

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PAR AND YARDAGE – Southern Hills Country Club will play at 7,093 yards and a par of 35-35—70. Cedar Ridge Country Club, the second course used for stroke play, will play at 7,336 yards and a par of 35-35—70.

ARCHITECTS – Southern Hills Country Club was designed by Perry Maxwell and opened in 1936. Cedar Ridge Country Club was designed by Joe Finger and opened in 1969.

SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB HOLE BY HOLE

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total
Yards 466 485 451 369 652 197 380 243 372 3,615
Par 4 4 4 4 5 3 4 3 4 35

Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total
Yards 366 170 455 535 218 409 507 355 463 3,478
Par 4 3 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 35

CEDAR RIDGE COUNTRY CLUB HOLE BY HOLE

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total
Yards 507 198 379 440 565 195 461 431 424 3,600
Par 4 3 4 4 5 3 4 4 4 35

Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total
Yards 447 389 412 235 580 209 479 500 485 3,736
Par 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 35

COURSE SETUP – The championship setup will result in a USGA Course Rating® of 75.8 and a Slope Rating® of 140 at Southern Hills Country Club and 76.6 and 138 at Cedar Ridge Country Club.

Tees and fairways, height of grass – .375 to .400 inches
Putting greens, speed – 12 to 12 ½ feet on USGA Stimpmeter
Intermediate Rough – 1 ½ to 1 ¾ inches
Primary Rough – 2 ¾ inches

USGA AND OKLAHOMA – The 2009 U.S. Amateur will be the 19th USGA championship conducted in the state of Oklahoma. The most recent USGA championship in the state was the 2009 U.S. Amateur Public Links, held July 13-18 at Jimmie Austin OU Golf Club in Norman.

It is the ninth USGA championship and second U.S. Amateur held at Southern Hills Country Club. Previously, the club has hosted three U.S. Opens (1958, 1977, 2001), the 1987 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur, the 1965 U.S. Amateur, the 1961 USGA Senior Amateur, the 1953 U.S. Junior Amateur and the 1946 U.S. Women’s Amateur.

Cedar Ridge hosted the 1983 U.S. Women’s Open and has served as the site for numerous USGA qualifying events.

Prior to this year, Oklahoma has held two USGA championships in the same year on two occasions, in 1953 and 1960. In 1953, the USGA conducted the U.S. Junior Amateur at Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa and the U.S. Amateur at Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club. In 1960, the USGA conducted the U.S. Girls’ Junior at The Oaks Country Club in Tulsa and the U.S. Women’s Amateur at Tulsa Country Club.

Year and Championship – Winner

2001 U.S. Open – Retief Goosen, 276 (-4), by two strokes over Mark Brooks in playoff
1987 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur – Cindy Scholefield def. Pat Cornett-Iker, 6 and 5
1977 U.S. Open – Hubert Green, 278 (-2), by one stroke over Lou Graham
1965 U.S. Amateur – Robert Murphy Jr., 291, by one stroke over Robert Dickson
1961 USGA Senior Amateur – Dexter Daniels def. Col. William Lanman Jr., 2 and 1
1958 U.S. Open – Tommy Bolt, 283 (+3), by four strokes over Gary Player
1953 U.S. Junior Amateur – Rex Baxter Jr. def. George Warren III, 2 and 1
1946 U.S. Women’s Amateur – Babe Didrikson Zaharias def. Clara Sherman, 11 and 9

GROUPINGS AND STARTING TIMES – Groupings and starting times will be distributed when finalized. They will also be posted at www.usamateur.org

WEB SITE – Visit www.usamateur.org for the latest news, photos and scores from the championship.

TELEVISION COVERAGE – The U.S. Amateur will receive 10 hours of coverage on Golf Channel and NBC.

Date Network Program Broadcast Hours (EDT)
Aug. 26 Golf Channel 1st Round 4-6 p.m.
Aug. 27 Golf Channel 2nd Round 1-3 p.m.
Aug. 28 Golf Channel Quarterfinals 1-3 p.m.
Aug. 29 NBC Semifinals 4-6 p.m.
Aug. 30 NBC Final 4-6 p.m.

ADMISSION – Tickets can be purchased online at www.2009usamateur.com or by calling 888-695-0888. Daily grounds tickets are $15; weekly grounds tickets are $50; and weekly clubhouse tickets are $120. Children 17 and under are admitted free, if accompanied by a paying adult.

FORMAT – The first and second rounds of stroke play are set for Monday and Tuesday (Aug. 24-25) at Southern Hills Country Club and Cedar Ridge Country Club. All match play rounds will be played at Southern Hills Country Club, beginning Wednesday (Aug. 26). A single round of match play is scheduled on Wednesday, followed by the second and third rounds on Thursday (Aug. 27), and single rounds again from Friday-Sunday (Aug. 28-30).

SCHEDULE OF PLAY

  • Monday, Aug. 24 – First round, stroke play (18 holes)
  • Tuesday, Aug. 25 – Second round, stroke play (18 holes)
  • Wednesday, Aug. 26 – First round, match play (18 holes)
  • Thursday, Aug. 27 – Second round, match play (18 holes); Third round, match play (18 holes)
  • Friday, Aug. 28 – Quarterfinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Saturday, Aug. 29 – Semifinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Sunday, Aug. 30 – Final, match play (36 holes)

WHO CAN PLAY – The U.S. Amateur Championship is open to amateur golfers who have a USGA Handicap Index not exceeding 2.4.

QUALIFYING – National qualifying is being conducted at 99 sites from July 20-Aug. 11.

ENTRIES – A total of 6,948 entries were accepted by the USGA for the 2009 U.S. Amateur Championship. The record number of entrants is 7,920, in 1999.

EXEMPT PLAYERS – There are currently 31 players fully exempt from qualifying for the 2009 U.S. Amateur Championship:

  • Tyson Alexander, Gainesville, Fla. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Brad Benjamin, Rockford, Ill. 2009 U.S. Amateur Public Links champion
  • Josh Brock, Wilmington, N.C. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Bronson Burgoon, The Woodlands, Texas – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • David Erdy, Boonville, Ind. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Rickie Fowler, Murrieta, Calif. – returned scores for 72 holes at the 2008 U.S. Open; 2007 Walker Cup Match participant; member of the USA 2008 World Amateur Team Championship squad; finished among the top eight individual scorers at the 2008 World Amateur Team Championship; qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Nicolas Geyger, Chile – finished among the top eight individual scorers at the 2008 World Amateur Team Championship
  • Graham Hill, Canada – 2008 U.S. Amateur quarterfinalist
  • Matt Hill, Canada – 2009 NCAA Men’s Division I individual champion
  • Morgan Hoffmann, Saddle Brook, N.J. – 2008 U.S. Amateur quarterfinalist
  • Charlie Holland, Dallas, Texas – 2008 U.S. Amateur quarterfinalist
  • Jay Hwang, San Diego, Calif. – 2009 U.S. Junior Amateur runner-up
  • Tim Jackson, Germantown, Tenn. – amateur returning lowest 72-hole score at the 2009 U.S. Senior Open
  • Jesper Kennegard, Sweden – finished among the top eight individual scorers at the 2008 World Amateur Team Championship
  • Drew Kittleson, Scottsdale, Ariz. – 2008 U.S. Amateur runner-up
  • Scott Lewis, Henderson, Nev. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Ben Martin, Greenwood, S.C. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • George ‘Buddy’ Marucci Jr., Villanova, Pa. – 2008 USGA Senior Amateur champion
  • Adam Mitchell, Chattanooga, Tenn. – 2008 U.S. Amateur semifinalist
  • Todd Mitchell, Bloomington, Ill. – 2008 U.S. Mid-Amateur runner-up
  • Matt Nagy, Buena Vista, Ga. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Jack Newman, Des Moines, Iowa – 2008 U.S. Amateur Public Links champion
  • Cameron Peck, Olympia, Wash. – 2008 U.S. Junior Amateur champion
  • Kyle Peterman, Springfield, Ill. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Patrick Reed, Augusta, Ga. – 2008 U.S. Amateur semifinalist
  • Jordan Spieth, Dallas, Texas – 2009 U.S. Junior Amateur champion
  • Nick Taylor, Canada – finished among the top eight individual scorers at the 2008 World Amateur Team Championship; qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open (low amateur); 2009 U.S. Amateur Public Links runner-up
  • Cameron Tringale, San Juan Capistrano, Calif. – qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Drew Weaver, High Point, N.C. – 2007 British Amateur champion; qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open
  • Steve Wilson, St. Martin, Miss. – 2008 U.S. Mid-Amateur champion
  • George Zahringer, New York, N.Y. – 2008 USGA Senior Amateur runner-up

HISTORY – The U.S. Amateur Championship is the oldest golf championship in this country, one day older than the U.S. Open. Except for an eight-year period, 1965-1972, when it was stroke play, the Amateur has been a match-play championship.

Throughout its history, the U.S. Amateur has been the most coveted of all amateur titles. Many of the great names of professional golf, such as Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Lanny Wadkins, Craig Stadler, Jerry Pate, Mark O'Meara, Hal Sutton, Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods, grace the Havemeyer Trophy.

It was, however, legendary amateur Robert T. Jones Jr., who first attracted national media coverage and sparked spectator attendance at the U.S. Amateur Championship. Jones captured the championship five times (1924, 1925, 1927, 1928, 1930). His 1930 victory was a stunning moment in golf history when, at Merion Cricket Club in Ardmore, Pa., Jones rounded out the Grand Slam, winning the four major American and British championships in one year.

Sixty-six years later, in 1996, Tiger Woods of Cypress, Calif., attracted similar interest and enthusiasm at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club in North Plains, Ore., when he won a record third straight U.S. Amateur. In 1994, Woods, at 18, had first entered the record book as the youngest ever to win the Amateur Championship, following his three consecutive Junior Amateur titles (1991-1993). In 1996, he smashed yet another record when he won, having registered 18 consecutive match-play victories.

2008 CHAMPION – Danny Lee, of New Zealand, defeated Drew Kittleson, of Scottsdale, Ariz., 5 and 4, at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club in the Village of Pinehurst, N.C., becoming the youngest Amateur champion in the event’s 113-year history. One month past his 18th birthday, Lee was six months younger than Woods was when he won the 1994 U.S. Amateur. Lee has turned professional and will not defend his title.

FOR THE WINNER – The champion receives:

  • A gold medal, and custody of a replica of the Havemeyer Trophy for the ensuing year
  • An exemption from local and sectional qualifying at the next U.S. Open Championship, if still an amateur
  • An exemption from local qualifying for future U.S. Open Championships, if still an amateur
  • An exemption from sectional qualifying for the next 10 U.S. Amateur Championships
  • An exemption from sectional qualifying for the next 10 U.S. Senior Open Championships, if still an amateur and otherwise eligible
  • An exemption from sectional qualifying at the U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship for the next 15 years or 15 years from the time the player becomes age eligible
  • An exemption from sectional qualifying at the USGA Senior Amateur Championship for the next 15 years or 15 years from the time the player becomes age eligible
  • An exemption into the next British Open, if still an amateur
  • A likely invitation to compete in the next Masters Tournament, if still an amateur

THE TROPHY – The original U.S. Amateur Championship trophy, the Havemeyer Trophy, was destroyed by a fire in 1925 at East Lake Country Club in Atlanta, Ga., where it was being displayed by virtue of Robert T. Jones Jr.’s victory in the U.S. Amateur that same year. It had originally been presented by Theodore A. Havemeyer, the first president of the United States Golf Association. The trophy was replaced in 1926 by Edward S. Moore, USGA treasurer from 1922-1925.

FUTURE SITES – In 2010, the championship will be held at Chambers Bay in University Place, Wash., Aug. 23-29. The 2011 U.S. Amateur will be played Aug. 22-28 at Erin Hills Golf Club in Hartford, Wis. Cherry Hills Country Club in Cherry Hills Village, Colo., will host the 2012 U.S. Amateur, Aug. 20-26.

USGA MEDIA CONTACT – Pete Kowalski will be the USGA media representative on site. He can be reached at (908) 216-8435 or by e-mail at pkowalski@usga.org.

 

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